News


News

Slow down – it’s road safety week

Too many people die or are seriously injured on our New Zealand roads. These incidents place a huge toll on families, friends and our community. The cost of emergency services, medical care, reparation and human grief is enormous. In the past five years the share of hospital costs alone in the Midland Region was more…
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Trauma Nurse Workshop

The Midland Trauma System (MTS) hosted a workshop for the MTS Trauma nurse group in Hamilton on 20th July. This workshop was sponsored by the Midland Directors of Nursing and was organised to discuss the role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist –Trauma role and how it was operationalised in each of the Midland DHB’s. There…
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Did you see us at the Fieldays?

The staff from Midland Trauma and Waikato Mental Health and Addictions got out their gumboots and headed off to Mystery Creek for the 2016 Agriculture Fieldays. With over 130,000 people visiting the Fieldays, we were not alone. Our first appearance at the Fieldays was well received. Our stand’s backdrop reflected rural New Zealand, with written…
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Distracted drivers cause more crashes than drinking drivers

A crash resulting in serious injury or death is more likely to be caused by a distracted driver than a drinking one. And with the deaths of seven people in road crashes last weekend and a serious accident in Temple View on Friday, those working on the front line are pleading with drivers to stay…
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Reducing the burden of trauma

Every Christmas we hear about the ‘holiday death toll’, those happy holidays that for some people in an instant become tragic. But road accidents and trauma are not just a holiday phenomenon; trauma alone is estimated to cost the country more $43 million per year in hospital bills. Over 5000 people in the Midland health…
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Midland Trauma specialist impressed

“It is always exciting to see Company’s in our community see a way they can do something to support better outcomes for organisations such as the Rescue Helicopter. As a trauma specialist time is of the essence and this is such a positive way of supporting the service. We have been investigating how we can…
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Maori Injury: a New Zealand Experience of Indigenous Trauma

Dr. Grant Christey, General Surgeon and Director of Trauma at the Waikato Hospital in Hamilton, New Zealand talks about aspects of traumatic injury Maori people.

Subjects covered include: injury types, data collection and use, strengths and weaknesses of Maori in the mainstream health system and some of the Maori specific health services available in the Midland Region of New Zealand.

Recorded on Saturday, 23 August 2014 at the conjoint meeting of the Provincial Surgeons of Australia and the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons Trauma and Indigenous Health Committees, Darwin Convention Center, Northern Territory.

Source: Network for Indigenous Cultural and Health Education

Road crashes cost Waikato $111m

The number of people seriously injured in motor vehicle crashes is continuing to climb each year and is now the leading cause of trauma in the Waikato. And with the climbing rate, is the increasing social cost which shows road crashes cost the country $3.14billion a year, according to the Ministry of Transport. Although there…
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Quad bike crashes soaring in Waikato

The first one, in 2007, ruptured his spleen, nearly killing him. In November he was sent to the hospital again with five fractured ribs and a cracked sternum. But there's no quad bike accident that can keep Robert Fitzgerald's 62-year-old father from farming. Geoffrey Fitzgerald is already back to work on his Wharepuhunga farm, but not…
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Kids get on Right Track

Grant Christey didn't muck around when explaining to a bunch of young people what happens to car crash victims when they come into the Emergency Department. The clinical director of trauma services at Waikato Hospital says the fact two of the people on the Right Track programme needed help after becoming faint during his presentation…
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