Slow down – it’s road safety week


Slow down – it’s road safety week

Too many people die or are seriously injured on our New Zealand roads. These incidents place a huge toll on families, friends and our community. The cost of emergency services, medical care, reparation and human grief is enormous. In the past five years the share of hospital costs alone in the Midland Region was more than $52 million.

There is on average 880 road traffic crashes a year (including motorcycles) in the Midland Region that requires an admission to one of our hospitals.

Facebook-Road-Safety-Week-Stats

The main contributors to these statistics are known to be:

  • Speed
  • Driver Fatigue
  • Drink Driving
  • Distraction

To find out more about how you can keep you and your family safe visit some of these websites:

  • Fleet safety – safe driving tools and information for businesses
  • New Zealand Transport Agency advertising – see the latest road safety campaigns
  • Practice – Free, practical information to help learner drivers pass their restricted test
  • Rightcar – check the safety ratings of thousands of vehicles
  • Safer Journeys – the government’s strategy to road safety to 2020. This website outlines planned and current actions on areas of concern, including safe roads and roadsides, safe speeds, safe vehicles and safe drivers
  • Safe Teen Driver – a toolkit for parents of teen drivers
  • New Zealand Police

The Midland Trauma System is a network of specialised, clinical personnel committed to ensuring application of best practice in trauma care across the Midland Region. Along with ensuring the best clinical standard of care for trauma patients and their families the MTS collects and manages the regional trauma database that records all admitted trauma across the midland.

The overall incidence of trauma in the midland region has been steadily increasing with a 4-5% increase year on year over the last three years.

If you’re coming to Fieldays this year, come and visit us at the Health Hub (Stand 6 –Lower Marque) and learn more about the trauma that’s happening in your neighbourhood.

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